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BDD: A Three-Headed Monster by Liz

Published Mon 14 Dec 2015 19:31

676px-Hercules_and_Cerberus_LACMA_65.37.151Back in Greek mythology, there was a dog called Cerberus. It guarded the gate to the underworld, and it had three heads.

There was a great guy called Heracles (Hercules in Latin) who was a demi-god, which means he would have been pretty awesome if the gods hadn’t intervened to make go mad and kill his entire wife and family. Greek gods in general aren’t very nice, and you wouldn’t want them to visit at Christmas.

Heracles ended up atoning for this with twelve tasks, the last of which was to capture Cerberus himself. (It was meant to be ten tasks, but his managers decided that he had collaborated with someone from another team on one of them, and got paid by an external stakeholder for a second, so they didn’t count.)

Fortunately, it turns out that BDD’s a bit easier to tame than Cerberus, and it works best if you involve other people from the outset.

The first thing we do with BDD is have a bit of a conversation. If I know nothing about a project, I’ll ask someone to tell me about it, and whenever I think it’s useful, I ask the magic question: “Can you give me an example?”

If they aren’t specific enough – for instance, they say that there are these twelve labours they have to do – I’ll get them to be more specific. “Can you give me an example of a labour?” Labour to me means Jeremy Corbyn, not wrestling the Nemean Lion, so having these conversations helps me to find out about any misunderstandings early.

Eventually, we end up with something we can think about in concrete terms. There’s a template that we use in BDD – Given a context, when an event happens, then an outcome should occur – but even without the template, having a concrete example which starts from some context, has an event happen and ends with a desired outcome (or the best possible outcome that we can reasonably expect to happen, at least) is useful. It lets us talk about those scenarios, and ask questions about other scenarios that might exist.

Exploration by Example (what it could do)

I like to ask two questions, the patterns for which I call Context Questioning, and Outcome Questioning. “Is there any other context, which, for the same event, gives us a different outcome?” And, “Is there any other outcome that’s important?”

The first is easy. We can usually think of ways that our outcome might be thwarted, and if we can’t, then our testers can, because testers have that “break all the things!” mindset that causes them to think of scenarios that might go a different way to the way we expect.

The second is especially useful though, because it lets us talk about what other stakeholders might need to be involved, and what they need. This is particularly important if there’s a transaction happening – both stakeholders get what they want from it, or three if you’re buying a product or service via a third party like Uber. Without it, you might end up getting one stakeholder’s desired outcome but missing the other.

“Why did they leave that wooden horse out there anyway?”

“We should ask a tester. Do we have any left that haven’t been eaten by sea-serpents?”

With these two questioning patterns, we can start to explore the scope of our requirements. We now know what the system could do. What should it do? By deciding which scenarios are out of scope, we narrow down the requirements. If we don’t know enough to decide what our scenarios ought to look like, we can either do something to try it out in a way that’s safe-to-fail and get some understanding (useful if nobody in the organization has ever done it before) or we can find an expert to talk to (if they’re available).

If you find you never talk about scenarios which you decide are out-of-scope or irrelevant, either quickly or later on, you may not be exploring enough.

Specification by Example (what it should do)

Now we’ve narrowed it down to what it should do, and we’ve got some scenarios to illustrate those aspects of behaviour, we can start turning the ideas into reality. The scenarios give us a focus, and let us continue to ask questions. If we ever come across an area we’re not familiar with, we can fall back into exploration, until we have understanding and can specify once more what our system should do.

“So, if we frown really fiercely and heavily at Charon, he should let us past to get to Cerberus. What does a really fierce frown look like? Can you give me an example?”

“Well, imagine someone just used the words ‘target velocity’ in your hearing…”

“Oh, like this?

And, once we’ve made our ideas into something real, we can use our scenarios to see whether it does what we thought it should do – a test.

Test by Example (what it does)

We can run through the scenario again, either manually or using automation, to see if it works.

And, ideally, we write the automated version of the test first, so that it gives us a very clear focus and some fast feedback; though if we’re in high-uncertainty and keep having to fall back to exploration, we might want to lay off of that for a bit.

“So, what did happen?”

“Um, I chopped off a head, and it grew back. Twice…”

“Oh, sugar. Hold on… I think Jason ran into the same behaviour last week. I can’t remember whether it was intended or not…”

And that’s it.

Some people really focus on the tools and testing. Others focus on specification. Really, though, it’s exploration that we start with; those thought-experiments that are cheap to change, and not nearly as dangerous as the real thing.

In our software, we’re not even dealing with three-headed dogs or mythical monsters; just people who want things. They aren’t even intent on making it hard for us. Even better, those people often find value in small things, and don’t need us to finish all twelve tasks to have a completed story. It’s pretty easy to explore what they want using examples, then use the results of that conversation as specifications, then as tests.

Even so, if you do manage to tame BDD, with all three of its heads, you’re still pretty awesome.

Just remember that a puppy is not just for Christmas.


This article was originally published here.